Announcing My New Book with Oxford University Press

Since this blog is primarily designed to put out lay-level content on the origins of the New Testament (among other issues), I don’t normally talk about the more technical scholarly projects I am working on behind the scenes. So, here’s a little update on what I’ve been up to academically.

1. First, I am pleased to announce that I have signed a contract with Oxford University Press for a forthcoming volume entitled, Miniature Codices in Early Christianity. The volume will be appearing in the Oxford Early Christian Studies series.

I have been working on the subject of miniature codices for more than twenty years now, ever since doing my …

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Is P.Oxy. 5575 the Only Manuscript that Mixes Synoptic Material with the Gospel of Thomas?

Back in September of 2023, I published an article on the newly discovered “gospel” manuscript from Oxyrhynchus: “New ‘Gospel’ Manuscript Discovered? (What it Is and Why it Matters).”

That manuscript, labelled P.Oxy. 5575, is a small papyrus manuscript dated to the second-century that exhibits a most notable feature, namely that it apparently contains a conglomeration of material from Matthew (6:25-26, 28-33) and Luke (12:22, 24, 27-31), and this Matt/Luke material is laid alongside portions from the Gospel of Thomas (27, 36, 63).

Indeed, it is this feature that has generated all the online buzz. Why? Because this is purportedly the only known manuscript that mixes Synoptic material with material from …

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What Should We Make of the Hypothetical “Q” Source?

Students of the Gospels will know that there has been a long-standing discussion among scholars about the relationship between the Synoptic Gospels (Matthew, Mark, and Luke). These three Gospels are so similar at so many points (often word for word), that it raises a number of intriguing questions. Did they know each other? Did they use each other?

For generations, the dominant answer to this question has been the so-called “Two Source” hypothesis. In brief, that hypothesis argues that Mark wrote first, and then Matthew and Luke independently used Mark.  Since Matthew and Luke did not know each other (so the argument goes), then the common material they share that …

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Why Are People So Fascinated with ‘Lost’ Books of the Bible?

Exactly one month ago, I published a TGC article on the recently discovered ‘gospel’ manuscript from Oxyrhynchus, P.Oxy. 5575. This new manuscript is noteworthy for many reasons (which I cover in the article), but mostly because it includes material from the Gospel of Thomas laid alongside material from Matthew and Luke.

While such a discovery certainly deserves academic attention, the internet “buzz” generated by this new manuscript has been fascinating to watch. Indeed, it reminds me that there always seems to be a disproportionate cultural fascination with “lost” Gospel or “hidden” texts about Jesus.  Write an article about the canonical Gospels and you might get a few hits. Write an …

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What I’ll Be Up to at the TGC National Conference

Next week, Sept 25-27 th , I’ll be headed to Indianapolis to participate in The Gospel Coalition National  Conference entitled, “Hope in the Wilderness.”

The conference this year is unique because TGC is partnering with other organizations to offer “micro events.” These are sort of like smaller conferences within the larger conference. So, while TGC has invited plenary speakers, and even sponsored some of their own breakout sessions, each of these organizations have invited their own speakers.

On that note, Reformed Theological Seminary has a micro event with a number of speakers including myself, James Anderson, Greg Beale, Scott Swain, Leigh Swanson, Nancy Guthrie, Melissa Kruger, and Ligon Duncan.

In …

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