Do We Have the Right Books in Our Canon?

I was recently interviewed by Gavin Ortlund on his podcast: “Which Canon is the Right One?” Enjoy!

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A Preview of What I Will Be Up To at ETS and SBL

Next week I will be headed to Dallas, and then to San Antonio, for the annual meetings of the Evangelical Theological Society (ETS) and Society of Biblical Literature (SBL)—two of the largest scholarly gatherings in the world. In addition to the normal meals, gatherings, and meeting with old friends, here’s a little preview of what I will be up to.

1. Time with the Executive Committee.  As a former president of ETS (2019), I am still serving on the Executive Committee which now consists of Al Mohler, D.A. Carson, Timothy George, Gregg Allison, Sam Storms, David Dockery, and Craig Keener.  And I should not forget to mention our …

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How Difficult was the Book of Revelation’s Journey into the Canon?

The story of the New Testament canon is a fascinating one, with many twists and turns.  There are books that were accepted very quickly, almost from the start (e.g., the four gospels), and there are other books that struggled to find a home (e.g., 2 Peter).

And then there is the book of Revelation.

Few today would contest the claim that the book of Revelation stands as one of the most controversial, complicated, and esoteric books in the New Testament canon.  Perhaps it should come as no surprise, then, that its reception by the early church was equally complicated and controversial.

But, the story of the book of Revelation is …

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Were the New Testament Authors Aware of Their Own Authority?

Sometimes, even in the academic world, things get said so many times that people assume they are true.   And when that happens, no one bothers to look at the historical evidence in a fresh way.

One example, which is fairly routine these days, is to assert that the New Testament authors certainly did not think they were writing Scripture, nor had any awareness of their own authority. Mark Allan Powell, in his New Testament introduction, affirms this view plainly, “The authors of our New Testament books did not know that they were writing scripture.”[1]  Gamble takes the same approach, “None of the writings which belong to the NT was …

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Looking for a Lay-Level Class on the Origins of the NT Canon? Here’s my 6-Part Video Series with @Ligonier

One of the most common questions I am asked is whether I have introductory, lay-level material on the origins of the NT canon that people can use in their churches.  For small group Bible studies or Sunday School classes, most people simply won’t read Canon Revisited or any of my other books.

So, I point the reader to my recent video series with Ligonier where I give six introductory lectures on the origins and authority of the NT canon.  My hope is that this will meet a need for churches looking to do something on canon but not knowing where to turn.

You can order the videos here in …

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