The Great Race

“He who honors me, I will honor” (1 Samuel 2:30).

That was the verse that was handed to Scottish runner Eric Liddell moments before he ran the 400 meters in the 1924 Olympics.  It was not the event that he had trained for. He was a sprinter and was favored in the 100 meters. But the heats for the 100 were on a Sunday, and he would not run.

Although hailed as a hero now (and made famous by the movie Chariots of Fire), Liddell’s refusal to run on Sunday made him the object of severe ridicule and scorn by both the British people and the British press. The …

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Here’s What Christians Should Be Busy Protesting

There’s a lot of protesting going on in our culture today.  Seems like everyone is upset about something.  And they are quite willing to let the world know about it.  Indeed, even in the evangelical Christian world, it seems like protesting has become the thing to do.

The key question, however, will always be, “Against what things should Christians offer a protest?”

I suppose there are many answers to that question. But, as we near the 500th anniversary of Luther’s nailing of the 95 theses to the Wittenberg door (Oct 31st), we should at least consider what the Reformers were busy protesting.

After all, that is what the Reformers were.  …

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Are Protestants Closer to Catholics than Martin Luther? A Response to the Recent Pew Study (Part 2)

Last week, I posted the first of a two-part response to a recent Pew study which claimed that modern Protestants sound more like Catholics when it comes to issues like sola scriptura and sola fide.

While modern Protestants certainly have some significant theological weak spots, I pushed back against the results of this study on the grounds that the questions being asked were fundamentally misleading.  Indeed, the theological descriptions of the Protestant (and Catholic!) positions were flat out wrong.

Having already dealt with the sola scriptura issue in the prior post, we now turn to the issue of sola fide.  Here is the summary of the Pew survey …

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The @RTSCharlotte Women’s Bible Study is Back

From 2014 to 2016, I taught a weekly Bible study on the RTS campus for women in the Charlotte community.  We studied the book of Romans over the course of two years.

It was so encouraging to see the enthusiastic response from these women who were eager to learn more about the message of Romans.  All 42 sessions are available on HD video (along with handouts) on the RTS Charlotte website here.

After taking a year off, we are kicking off the study again this coming fall.  This time we will be studying the book of Hebrews.  This is a fantastic book for many reasons, but most of all …

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The Achilles Heel of the New Perspective on Paul

As most readers know, there has been a long scholarly debate over what is known as the New Perspective(s) on Paul (NPP). This approach argues that “justification” in Paul does not mean what many Christians (especially Reformed folks) have always believed.

In short, NPP advocates (e.g., N.T. Wright, James D.G. Dunn) argue that when Paul mentions “justification by faith” he is not referring to a doctrine about how one gets saved but to how membership in the covenant community can be obtained without the standard Jewish boundary markers laid out in the law of Moses (food laws, circumcision, Sabbath observance).

In other words, justification is less about soteriology and more …

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