Where Are They Now? RTS Charlotte Alumnus Jordan Olshefski

Jordan Olshefski

While God sends RTS Charlotte grads all over the world, sometimes he calls them to stay right here in Charlotte.  When he does so, it gives us a chance to watch their ministries grow and develop in our own city.

This is the case with the next individual in the Where Are They Now? series: Jordan Olshefski.  Jordan was my TA at the seminary and also my intern at my church (Uptown PCA)–duties which he (incredibly) upheld at the same time.  It has been a blessing having him stay around.

Jordan gets the award for the most thorough answers (so far) to the interview questions (which is no surprise if …

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Does the Bible Ever Get it Wrong? Facing Scripture’s Difficult Passages (#1): Greg Beale

Greg Beale

In a prior post (see here), I announced a new blog series designed to address problematic passage in the Bible.  This new series is largely a response to the one by Peter Enns’ entitled, “Aha moments: biblical scholars tell their stories.”

The first contributor in this series is Greg Beale (Ph.D., Cambridge University).  Greg is the J. Gresham Machen Chair of New Testament and Biblical Theology at Westminster Theological Seminary, and the author of numerous books.  A few notables are: A New Testament Biblical Theology, The Book of Revelation (NIGTC), and The Temple and the Church’s Mission.

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Peter Enns begins his new blog …

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New Series: Does the Bible Ever Get it Wrong? Facing Scripture’s Difficult Passages

Mistake

From Christianity’s earliest days, the Scriptures have had their critics. Porphyry, a third-century neoplatonic philosopher, was particularly aggressive in his attacks on the historical veracity of the Gospels, often pointing out what he deemed to be their inconsistencies, contradictions, and historical problems.

For example, he pointed out how Mark 1:2 is not really quoting (just) Isaiah as the passage seems to indicate (frag. 9).  Instead, it is actually a composite quote of Isaiah 40:3 and Mal 3:1 (with a little Ex 23:20 thrown in). Porphyry also attacked the infancy narratives in Matthew and Luke, claiming they contradict one another (frag. 11).

Feeling the weight of Porphyry’s attacks, Christian thinkers began …

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You Don’t Think Learning the Biblical Languages is Worth It? Think Again

Greek

Note:  I posted this article a year ago, but in light of the new seminary semester beginning, it seemed appropriate to post again.

In another month or so, a new crop of seminary students will begin the grueling month-long experience of Summer Greek.   And, like all seminary students before them, they will begin to ask the question of why studying these ancient languages even matters.   After all, a few years after graduation all will be forgotten.   In the midst of a busy pastoral life, who could possibly maintain proficiency in the languages?

As a result of these questions, some students decide (very early on) that the biblical languages are just …

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