Roundtable with Michael Licona on the Resurrection of Jesus

Resurrection of Jesus

This past Spring I was invited by the Southeastern Theological Review to join a roundtable discussion about Michael Licona’s recent book, The Resurrection of Jesus.  That discussion will soon appear in the Summer, 2012 issue.  Participants included myself, Danny Akin, Craig Blomberg, Paul Copan, Michael Licona, and Charles Quarles. Licona has written an excellent volume on the resurrection and I was pleased to be a part of the conversation.

The discussion was not only about Licona’s book, but particularly about the controversy over his view that Matt 27:52-53 may not be historical when it describes graves opening and people rising from the dead after the resurrection of Jesus.  Licona …

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Postmodernity and Politics: Moving Beyond “Jesus Is Neither a Democrat nor a Republican”

politics

Well, the political season is upon us again.  And it’s time for all sorts of Christian stock phrases about politics to be used and reused.  One of my favorite is the phrase, “Jesus is neither a Democrat nor a Republican.”  This is one of those phrases that is used so frequently that no one really bothers to ask what it means; nor does anyone bother to ask whether it is really true. But, I want to take a moment to analyze this phrase as we head into this political season.  What does it really mean?  Here are some possibilities:

1. The phrase could simply mean that the Bible doesn’t speak

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Baur vs. Bauer: Is the New Testament Really Filled with Contradictory Theologies?

Peter and Paul United

Perhaps no book in the history of the world has received as much scrutiny and criticism as the Bible.  For generations, scholars have picked apart every aspect of this book: its history, its transmission, its veracity, its theology, its morality, etc.  It has been criticized, ridiculed, mocked and condemned.  However, in their haste to heap criticism on the Bible, occasionally critics offer arguments that actually prove to be inconsistent with one another.  They make accusations against the Scripture that are mutually exclusive—they cannot all be true.  Of course, such inconsistencies are rarely noticed.  If a scholar is intent to find contradictions in the Bible, he will rarely find contradictions in …

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10 Misconceptions about the NT Canon: #7: “Christians Had No Basis to Distinguish Heresy from Orthodoxy Until the Fourth Century.”

orthodoxy and heresy

This is the seventh installment of a blog series announced here.

Ever since Walter Bauer published his now famous Orthodoxy and Heresy in Earliest Christianity there has been a widespread obsession amongst modern scholars with the theme of early Christian diversity.  Study after study has explored how different, contradictory, and divergent early Christian beliefs were.  And it is on this basis that the terms “heresy” and “orthodoxy” are declared to be unintelligible prior to the fourth century.  After all, we are told, there was no Christianity (as we know it) prior to this time period, but only a variety of different Christianities (plural) all claiming they are the true …

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